Details for: Warlpiri
Language:
Warlpiri
Alternative names:
Elpira, Ilpara, Ngaliya, Ngardilpa, Wailbri, Walbiri, Walmama
Dialect of:
People:
Warlpiri
Genetic affiliation:
Pama-Nyungan > Ngumpin-Yapa > Ngarrkic
Region:
Australia's Northern Territory
Latitude:
-16
Longtitude:
130
Number of speakers:
3000
Quote:
-Warlpiri is a South-West Ngarga language of the Pama-Nyungan group of Australian languages. It is most closely related to the language Warlmanpa.
Syllable types:
CV(C); CV(V)(C) in word-initial syllables
Ambisyllabicity:
yes
Restrictions on single onsets:
All syllables must have an onset [no syllable begins with a vowel]
Restrictions on onset clusters:
no syllable-initial consonant clusters
Restrictions on single codas:
No syllable ends with a stop or with the retroflex flap /ɽ/.
Restrictions on coda clusters:
Voiced-voiceless stop contrast:
no
Nasal contrast on consonants:
yes
Nasal-voiced stop contrast:
no
Nasal-voiced stop contrast restrictions:
Nasal-voiceless stop contrast:
yes
Nasal-voiceless stop contrast restrictions:
Nasal-oral vowel contrast:
no
Nasal-oral vowel contrast restrictions:
Nasal assimilation:
Directionality:
Trigger segments class:
Trigger segments list:
Conditions on trigger segments:
Target segments class:
Target segments list:
Conditions on target segments:
Nasal harmony:
no
Domain of spreading:
Directionality:
Valence:
Trigger segments class:
Trigger segments list:
Conditions on trigger segments:
Target segments class:
Target segments list:
Conditions on target segments:
Transparent segments class:
Transparent segments list:
Blockers class:
liquids
Blockers list:
Prenasalization of blockers:
Postnasalization of blockers:
Nasal morphemes:
Commutation level:
Spreading source:
Floating nasal:
Stylistic conditions:
Adjacency conditions:
Contour segments:
Source of contour segments:
Examples of contour segments:
Comments:
Anomalous segments:
Consonant examples:
Oral vowel examples:
Nasal vowel examples:
Stress rule(s):
Stress isn't usually distinctive, assigned by rule. Polysyllabic words receive primary stress on 1st syll, w/secondary stresses tending to occur on alternate syllables thereafter.
Stress source(s):
(rhythm may be broken by structure of the word - there are sometimes 3-syllable stress groups)
Remarks:
Data provided by:
Coler
Affiliation:
VU
Email:
ml.coler at let.vu.nl
Data based on acoustic evidence:
no
Data tested in laboratory:
no
Data collected:
from secondary sources
Primary source(s):
David Nash, PhD Dissertation. MIT
Secondary source(s):
Comments: